Wednesday, February 21, 2007

My Pots: Clay Is Not Dirt

I learned how to center clay on the wheel in 1977. I was at the time a monk. That is another post for another day. The person who taught me is currently the Abbott of the monastery. The person who taught him was also a monk, but of another monastery in Big Sur, California. We were all young then.

When I left the monastery in 1981, I found a job throwing pots here on the Oregon Coast. I also waited tables at a nearby resort. I was good at that job. I waited on Richard Avedon. That is my brush with celebrity there. I was affable. I was funny. We used to serve killer breads. Once, it was dill bread. I used to plunk it on the table, explain what it was, and ask my customers if they knew what they made that bread out of. They would shrug their shoulders and naively ask, "What?" "Dill dough," I would say. They would laugh.

Clay is not dirt. Clay is broken down rocks. Over millions of years, the rock is munched into tiny, flat platelets. They have ragged edges, but smooth surfaces. The presense of water lets them slide against each other. Billions of little tiles move when pressure from my hands exerts force. They go where I want them to go. When the water evaporates, they stick together. But it is only under the conditions of calcining that they fuse. All you have to do is bring the clay up to a red heat; when the pots glow, the clay becomes one. Forever. In this process chemically combined molecules of H2O are driven off. You can actually see the steam escaping in a tubular cloud through the upper vent hole of the kiln. Hold a piece of glass against the cloud and you will see water condensing. Also driven off are noxious sulphur gasses. It is never wise to fire off a load of pots in your kitchen.

The first fire is called the bisque, or bisquit fire. This process requires bringing the pots up to about 1900 degrees F. The pots are cooled, wax resist is applied to the foot of each pot, and then they are dipped in glaze. Glaze contains a goodly amount of different clays and fluxes such as borax, nephaline cyanite, gerstley borate, lithium carbonate, iron, copper, tin, iron chromate, koalin (which is where the word Kaopectate comes from---kaolin is the Chinese word for clay), and all manner of other possible ingredients that go into the glaze recipe. I created my own glaze recipies through lots of trial and tons more error. When dipped in the glaze, the wax resist repels it so that the pot won't fuse to the shelf during the firing.

My mentor from the "outside," Jeff Procter, used to say that the teapot is the ultimate example of a potter's abilities. He is correct. A teapot utilizes the cylinder, the fitted lid, a small bottle that turns into the spout, and attaching techniques with which are applied the handle and the spout. It's all there. Everything a potter can possibly do is carried out in a teapot. You can consider the lid a small plate or a shallow bowl.

The wall hanging platters are simply very large plates. I forgot to include my dinner plates, but they are simply small platters, right? The darker green platter measures 19 1/4 inches across; the pinkish one 18 1/4 inches.

The black bowls incorporate 30% local native clay from the banks of the Santiam River. Black iron oxide darkens the otherwise dark brown rendered by the iron rich native clay. These bowls are nearly all exactly the same size.

That floppy looking "art" bowl has a neat story. I botched a wide brimmed bowl and took it outside, set it on a stump and then shot it with my .22 Marlin target rifle. I have included two views. Can you tell which one shows where the bullet entered and which side it exited?

Every potter has his or her style bundled into the coffee mug. I am proud of this form. If you look closely, there are little notches excised with a cheesecutter along the lower edge, just above the foot. I like a deeply carved foot to raise the form off the table. Every one of my pots has a slight 45 degree bevel running along the circumference of the foot. This creates a shadow that visually prohibits the pot from becoming a part of the surface upon which it rests. Jeff taught me that. The swirl in the center of the pots is something you see in many, many potters' work. It is fun to see milk pooling in the troughs and breaking on the ridges of the swirl.

I like to make functional stoneware. Nothing pleases me more than knowing that people are going to be kissing my mugs, bringing refreshment to their lips and experiencing joy in their bodies.

I like to make tea bowls for the same reason.

I fire my pots to cone 8. Cone 6 is 2,194 degrees, so cone 8 is only slightly higher. Cone 10 is 2,350 degrees. So, it's somewhere in there. I fire in what is called an oxidation atmosphere as opposed to a reduction atmosphere. The latter involves a carbon based fuel such as wood or propane. During the glaze firing, the potter shuts off the flue, preventing the fire from escaping out the chimney and flooding the kiln space with carbon. This carbon actually enters on a molecular level the glazes and clay body themselves creating chemical reactions. A celedon, for instance, is simply a clear glaze with less than one half of one percent of iron oxide added. The reduction turns the glaze into a ghostly light green. A bright red is also created with about the same amount of iron, but in a slightly different glaze base. Blues are created by adding a similar amount of copper carbonate. In an oxidation atmosphere, there is no reduction at all. So the reddish, pinkish and blueish hues you are seeing are some magic that I had to work out chemically in the creation of my glazes.

There are these things called cones, hence, cone 6, cone 8, cone 10, etc. They are white, tapering triangular 3 inch towers made of composites designed to begin melting at exactly those temperatures desired by the potter. Three of them are placed, wide bottom first, into a pat of wet clay, then set on the shelf just inside a spy hole. The lead cone is called the guide cone, the middle, the target cone and the third, the guard cone. When the guide cone begins to bend, it is time to start paying close attention. I like to fire until the middle cone is touching the back of the guide cone, almost flat, and the guard cone is bowing its tip toward the group of two ahead of it. Perfect.

The temperature alone is not what makes the whole thing come together. The term is "heat work." This is temperature over time. And there is no cheating that part of the process. In life, it's the same. Some things require events over time.

As the kiln cools, you will hear pinging---the sound of the glaze shrinking beyond the shrinkage of the clay body. If a glaze does not fit the clay body properly it will sometimes just fall off the pot. Some crazing always occurs, but the clay body becomes vitreous to a less than 3 or 4 percent porosity. It holds water. The word "crazy" comes from this phenomenon. Too much tension and something has to give. You crack.

Once I found a mouse in my bucket of slurry. Poor thing couldn't get out and drowned. I encased it in slip, let it dry and then fired it off. That was cool.

Whelp, there ya have it.


I hope you enjoy the images, my friends.

(Sorry these don't enlarge when you click on them. I forgot that I used a zoon feature that reduces the pixel count. You can still figure out the bullet-shot bowl quiz though. G)





































































44 Comments:

At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 3:04:00 AM PST , Blogger goldennib said...

Wow, you pieces are beautiful. I love the lightening signature mark on the handles and the bottoms of the bowls. The colors are great. The forms are awesome.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 5:44:00 AM PST , Blogger mindy said...

love them!! i always wanted to take a pottery class... maybe i will!

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 6:25:00 AM PST , Blogger ARM said...

Wow! I learned something today (something that I probably would have learned if I had attended the pottery class in high school the teacher wanted me to...I didn't want to)!!

And that is a coffee mug - very awesome! Do you stamp your pieces? There are a couple of them that have a little flower or something on the side. What is that? Oh, and that third tea pot is amazing. I love the handle.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 6:28:00 AM PST , Blogger Blue the Spa Girl said...

You are amazing G.
I love these!!! They are divinely beautiful. Your colours, fantastic!
I love all the information you gave about the types of clay; we use bentonite and kaolin in cosmetic masques, they draw impurities from the skin.
The bullet hole piece is wonderful, accidently on purpose.
Thanks for sharing this, you have made my day!
xo

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 6:51:00 AM PST , Anonymous Quilly said...

Beauty and function. These are gorgeous. I imagine those who kiss your mugs feel honored to do so -- and the bottom picture of the "murdered" bowl shows the exit wound facing the camera (I can't believe you took a picture of your crime).

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 9:00:00 AM PST , Blogger Ps said...

wow Gawpo.That was exhaustively informative! I tried my hand at making pottery just once--it was so so so tough to get any kind of shape.Since then i've preferred a brushes and canvas:-)
Your creations are beautiful.The story about the rat was amusing.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 10:47:00 AM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Au-Nib: Good that you noticed that in the teapot handle. People who attach clay handles to their teapots should not throw stones in their glass house. (?) Something like that. Anyway, that handle is and extrusion. I laid out a 3-4 inch diameter length of clay and then dragged a handmade wire tool right down the middle of its length. The wire is heavy guage piano wire, shaped sort of like a clover leaf. Its ends are anchored in a large dowel. Fishing line is tied to the apex of the wire for support and pulled through. When I got to the middle of the extrusion, I very carefully ziz-zagged the wire to make the pointy things. It is my favorite teapot.

Mindy: I assume you have a butt. GET IT TO A WHEEL THROWING CLASS!!!! And thank you for the nice words.

Arm-mander: Good eye you have! Yes, that little signature "catpaw" looking adornment is created with another handmade tool. Simply a small 3/8 inch dowl ground flat at opposing 45 degree angles. Then I filed a notch perpendicular to the gound surfaces, sort of making look like an arrow nock. I press two dots, then rotate 90 degrees for the second set of two dots, creating this little spot where the glaze can pool in the troughs and break on the ridges. You have a butt, too, don't you? Follow advice given to Mindy.

Blue TSG: And I love that you love these! When I designed the colors, they did not have a "u" in them. You have regally adorned them with a liguistic artifact of the Crown. Did you know that Bentonite is a volcanic clay? True story. Here in the land of Mt. St. Helen we are rich in residual ash which I also use in another of my glazes. Makes for a honey gold color....I mean colour. I might add that I am delighted to have been your daymaker.

Qilly: Yes, when form not only follows function but is beautiful as well, it all comes together. I am currently kissing said mug as I pause between writing here. Liquid medium is noneother than coffee sent with love from my latest obssession (see previous post[s]). Heaven from the little redheaded girl. You win the guessing contest. Although all four surfaces were blown outward by rifling energies of the projectile, there is only stipling on the side opposite the entry wound. Lends more credibility to what is seen in the Zapruder film, if you ask me, as J.F.K.'s rearward jerk of the head led many to believe he had been hit from the front and to the right. Not so. I had to assassinate one of my pots to come to this conclusion? If ever accused, I will myself fall back on the Photoshop defense!

Ps: Yeah, I know. I saw how long the text is and wondered if anyone would spend all that time reading it. Oh well.....It had to be said. The truth had to come out. And it was a mouse, not a rat. Huge difference, you know. But I am not opposed to it.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 10:52:00 AM PST , Blogger somewhere joe said...

Great work, man - so many striking touches on these pieces, beyond competent. The handles on the teapots. The cascading green glaze over gorgeous rust. The confidence of the crimping on the bottom rim of the tea bowl. The black set so elegant and formal. Wonderful. And thanks for the primer on the process, fascinating details, and the gawpo lore that went with it. You waited on Richard Avedon? May I touch you?

Well, brother G, impressed doesn't quite say it. I'd say amazed but there's too much surprise in that word. And I'm not. But how many souls do I know with the stuff to challenge the sky and caress the earth? Can I be your friend?

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 11:19:00 AM PST , Blogger Logophile said...

I love, adore, venerate, relish, delight in, lust after your pottery.
Oooooh, you continue to amaze and delight
Someday, someday, when the stars align and conditions are perfect...
I must know that a Gawpo teapot is in my future.
It would be the perfect harmony of so many things I luuuuff.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 12:00:00 PM PST , Anonymous Kat said...

I live where Hull, McCoy and Friendship Pottery was once manufactured and Beuamont is still being manufactured. We are also home to the National Ceramic Center and Heritage Center. I have nothing but respect for potters. Since I'm basically creative (paint, sew, write, craft) and have collected stoneware for years, I took a pottery class. I hated the feel of the clay, I hated the hunch over the wheel, I hated that I couldn't get the shape in my head into my piece. So now there is no price too high for a piece I want, because I'm too wimpy to make it myself. Lovely work Gawpo. You'll have to fly down one year for the Pottery Festival.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 1:44:00 PM PST , Blogger Katie McKenna said...

Beautiful work! I especially love the bowls.. the green, teal, pink combo...

I have a few plates left from Sweden that were done in blues and greens.

Thanks for sharing - that's a wonderful lesson!

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 6:31:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

En Algun Lugar Jose: As would a father place his hand on the shoulder of his son, the "Good work, man" is an ordination of approval. Coming from deep places of respect for your capax dei, I humbly accept. In years, I am older; in seeing you are finer. I do appreciate what comes from you more than you know, you know.

I didn't recognize him until I saw the name on his credit card. He handed the card over, I read it right there. I said, "You're Richard Avedon?" He was shocked, I think, that I would know who he was. "Oh yeah," I replied. He then asked me what my favorite picture was. I said it was the portrait of Imogen Cunningham. He tipped well.

You may now touch me.

You are already my friend.

Logophile: Darn. I was hoping to impress you. I will keep trying.

A Gawpo teapot will be yours. Oh yes, it will be yours.

Kat: You are indeed smack in the Meow Middle of potteries. Coly How! It took me a very long time to learn how to center. It did not come easy. I had to invent a different way of doing it which I have not seen anyone else using. But I finally got it down. If I ever fly out for Airventure at Osh Kosh, WI, I will keep on going and visit you.

Katie: Isn't Montana on the way to Wisconsin and Ohio? Happy to have tickled your eye.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 6:54:00 PM PST , Blogger Blue the Spa Girl said...

(((Big Smile)))
Dill. Dough.


Halfway through my day I actually got that and nearly spewed milk out of my nose. I am so slow.
That is what happens when you are sleep deprived from caring for sick children in the night.

Ah, Gawpo. You slay me.
My girls were howling in the spa!!!

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 8:41:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Blue TSG: You continue to torture me. You know I have a thing for lactating noses and cherry tomatoes. And yet you persist in the tease. Sigh. Yeah, I made wine take that route at a table or two back then. Feels good to make someone laugh. Enjoying even more the thought that I might make girls in a spa giggle. Hope the chillens are feeling better. A face like O's needs to be smiling. I picture her compromise and the love you give her. Warms my heart. You are a good mommy.

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 9:25:00 PM PST , Blogger grumblemurray said...

Them looks like bought ones!

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 9:33:00 PM PST , Anonymous cindra said...

Ahem. 8 years. Count em'. EIGHT. years. since i met you. nuthin'. not a teapot. not a plate. not a bowl, a pot, not even a tuckin' frivet for my spoon. whadup with dat?

YOU ARE AMAZING. I cannot wait till the cheendruh j accurso pottery studio is built. damn it.

Beautiful post...beautiful stuff...beautiful you.

How's carMEla?

see you tomorrow!

xo

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 10:37:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Grumblemurray: And that is what I strive for. I want each and every piece look just like the ones that the molds make LOOK like handthrown pots. Yeah, with them throwrings and them drips and stuff. Uh-huh. Yup. THANKS, man! I love you. You GET me, Murray!

Cheen-Druh!: Ha! Yeah, I know. And it eats the hell out of you, don't it? I live for that. And to think, I gave "HER" one of my plates. Are you sure it's only been 8 years. All of a sudden it seems like a LOT longer.....

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 10:43:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Cheen-Druh!: Oh, and yes---I am certain there will be a post about carMEla in the offing. She already has a new "spot" picked out to sleep. On the bed here in the computer, fishing tackle, Ham radio shack, archery, ammo room.

Wish I could get that damn router working again!!!!

Am I seeing you tomorrow? I forgot. Friend Trish is going to the Drunkfest and will be using the place to crash; friend Summer drives up from Tulare tomorrow and will also visit at some point. Yes, Gawpo has a cluttered social calendar. I prioritize, however, around YOU. Know it. Believe it. Shut up, listen, learn! (Swimming With Sharks)

 
At Thursday, February 22, 2007 at 11:50:00 PM PST , Blogger LisaOceandreamer said...

So my internet is working fairly well right now. I've been visualizing high speed all day...NO, NOT doing high speed....VISUALIZING a speedy connection. Oh never mind.It took me a moment to get your comment about Don Ho you left. Aren't you just the clever guy?

SOOOO, you're a pot head eh? I tried throwing pots years ago but I didn't inhale...oh I mean they'd fall of the wheel. (geez, why am I am making drug references here....so not my world).
ANYWAY, on a different note I sure do like your work. I collect tea pots and yours are quite wonderful. Did you want me to email you my address? LOL!!!!!
Making pottery is a real art form . I have a healthy respect for a great bowl, cup, plate or whatever made from a lump of clay. When I got married we opted not for the traditional champagne flutes for our toast but instead hand made pottery goblets by a local artist.
Thanks for showing your pieces...interesting touch with the bullet holes.
Now I want to hear about this Monk part.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 4:34:00 AM PST , Blogger Mr. Fabulous said...

I am truly impressed and envious about your ability to create beautiful things like that...

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 5:54:00 AM PST , Anonymous Kat said...

Gawpo - You fly on out! I'll give you the grand tour, including the factory that used to stir their clay with blind horses. I can center the clay, I can even make some stuff, just not what I wanted to make.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 8:20:00 AM PST , Blogger Amy said...

My entire yard is clay, I like to call it dirt. I've spent years trying to manipulate my clay into something beautiful, but it's very nature makes it quite difficult. When the clay is dry it is next to impossible to get the shovel in because it is as hard as a rock. When the clay is wet it is extremely heavy, but easier to manipulate. The shovel often gets stuck in the wet clay and it makes a suction noise when I remove it. If I want to plant anything, I have to take away the clay and bring in new soil. My clay is a pain in the ass! Perhaps I should get a pottery wheel, I have my own plentiful clay source.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 9:57:00 AM PST , Blogger Diesel said...

Fascinating. You've inspired me to post a picture of the clay sculpture I did of my college roommate, George.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 1:42:00 PM PST , Blogger Sean said...

excellent piece. informative and entertaining. and your artwork is gorgeous. thanks for sharing it.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 3:41:00 PM PST , Blogger Claire said...

How cool! Lovely work you do.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 4:13:00 PM PST , Blogger Laurie said...

Beautiful pieces. I'm still giggling over the "dill dough" comment.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 6:16:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Lovely Lisa Oceandreamuh: I don't think you can discuss high speed and pot in the same breath and not become led to drugs. I've made lots 'o goblets; purchased and traded for lots 'o goblets; still have lots 'o goblets, but I prefer to see the colors presented through the wine and the "legs" that the rivulets of alcohol kick my way when blowing into the bowl. Haven't used a goblet in a long while. Shooting the pot (see, there we go again with the drug references) was a real.......blast. The monk part will be posted some day.

Mr. Fabuloso: Impressing you impresses me. What we envy in another is applause. I clap your way every day.

Kat: It just takes practice. You could do it in time. I know you could. I need to get out there to Oh Hi Oh for that tour. The blind horse clay stirring sounds awesome. Lots of clay history there.

Amy: Here is what I suggest----just carve out some masks and then cover the whole yard in firewood and torch it. You will have a yard pot. People will come from the four corners of the earth to see this gigantic piece of pottery. This could be the lemonade you make out of your lemons.

Diesel: I can't wait. I mean that. Did you encase him in slurry and then fire him off?

Sean: My GAWD, man! You made it over. Glad to see that. I still use your "broken bird" example. Almost daily. And you really had me when you posted that "tap, rack and roll." Clearing malfunctions has to happen without even thinking about it. I'm a big admirer of your page, Dude. You rock. And thank you for the very kind words. P.S. I am switching out my Model 21 for a "real" piece--my 1991 A-1.

Claire: Welcome! And thank you oh so very much.

Laurie: Why thank you. And glad you got a kick outta that.

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 9:36:00 PM PST , Blogger Rusty Nails said...

Dude, you are quite talented. Those are fabulous tea pots. And a good bit of science is involved there too.

Can you make a pottery urinal that prevents splashing and drips from those who cannot figure out how to efficiently use those complex devices?

 
At Friday, February 23, 2007 at 9:53:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Nusty Rails: My friend and fellow potter Craig Martell (has a website) once took me into the bathroom, all excited to "show me something." Rriiiiigggghhhhtttt. We rounded the corner and there they were: Urinals glazed in a breathtaking celedon. Craig said, "On second thought, piss on 'em." So we did.

Thanks for liking my work. And to answer your question, yes. I can. They're called swimming pools.

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 8:50:00 AM PST , Blogger Candace said...

So much I want to say here. I hope I remember it all.

First off, your work is simply AMAZING! Wow. Just. Wow. I love your glazes, I love the swirls at the bottom, I love the teapots - just wow!

As for the bullet one (did you already ansewr that? I haven't read all the comments yet) it looks to me like it entered through the edge at the top of the picture, and exited through the edge at the bottom.

Is that little flower that I see in a couple of them your own "mark?"

How on Earth did you get that black set so uniform?

And last, but not least - you GOT THE KITTY? How cool is that? Now she just needs one more kitty companion. >^_^<

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 9:39:00 AM PST , Blogger Just Tom said...

What does this have to do with Andrew Dice Clay and his return to the circuit. That's what I want to know.

Seriously, nice stuff and fun to see the other side of Gawpo. Do you think you will return to the wheel and the clay? I'd love to see you get back into it.

consider yourself aptly encouraged.

T

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 9:58:00 AM PST , Anonymous Gretchen said...

Jacob, I have forgotten how much I love your work. It gives me joy to see them on your post. I hope you are throwing now and getting high when the weather breaks! ~ g

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 10:33:00 AM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Candacia: Thank you! Just THANK YOU. So much. I am delighted to have delighted.

As for the bullet one, all four surfaces exploded outward. I didn't expect that. Yes, go see my reply to Quilldancer's guess in the first volley of responses. It's all about the stipling in forensics. And this murdered bowl is no exception.

Same instructions for the little flower question in reply to Amanda (ARM).

You are the first to axe about uniformity of the bowls. Here's how that happens. (In Rod Serling voice...) Imagine if you will....All these bowls use exactly one and one quarter pound of clay. That's where it begins. I open the form and make one pull. I then insert a half circle template made from wood into the bowl. I then pull the lip up to just beyond the top of the wood. Voila!

Carmela was taken to the shelter because she "doesn't like other cats." They wanted another, so they friggin' dumped her. Can you believe that? I wanted another one so there could be cat play in the house, but opted to take her so that she could have a good life as a loner. She has me. I try not to meow because it pisses her off.

Justamente Tomas!: You've never seen Andrew Dice Clay's tribute to his surname? I'm surprised. Maybe it will be on YouTube some day. Unlike the clay I talk about, he truly IS dirt.

The carport will be going up after the siding is done. It will become part studio space. I can't wait! I have been dying to throw. I am so excited!!!!!

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 10:35:00 AM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Gretchen!!!!: So happy am I to see you here. I love that you love my pots. How about meeting next week at the Vietnamese joint in Corvallis? March 5th.

lemmie gno.

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 2:16:00 PM PST , Blogger ARM said...

I want to see pictures of Carmela

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 2:51:00 PM PST , Blogger Candace said...

Aha! Thank you! I should have been less lazy and read all through the replies the first time around. :)

Oh, that's what I was going to say!
Have you ever read "A Single Shard" by Linda Sue Park? It would either be on the young adult shelf or the kid shelf at the library, but it's a good read even for adults. I bet there's some stuff that would speak to you in there. Basically: Korean orphan boy apprentices self to master potter (even though culture dictates that said should only teach his son) and eventually is tasked to take Master's finest piece/s to Emperor to vie for commission work.

As for Carmela, I totally understand. We saw some adoptees like that, too. You are such a wonderful guy to give her a loving home! X O >^_^< Oh, and I want to see piccys, too.

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 5:43:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Okay, goils.......

Arm: She is sleeping on the bed right next to me here in the whatever room. She picked that spot out right off the bat and goes to it every time I am in here. I love her.

Candacia: Yeah, I get lazy too. I try to read through what I can, but sometimes.......

Have not seen that book. I love the Asian culture around the arts. I have heard it said that the novice monk must spend two years learning how to close doors before getting a shot at a tea ceremony or other Zen-like practice. Have you read Lamb: The Gospel According To Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore? There's a great chapter in there where Jesus and Biff are in a similar situation. Hilarious book. I am sending it to Logo. She can pass it to whomever she so shall please. So you should shall please her.

When I was in Tram*Law spelled backwards (I have to disguise it because Cindra would be mad at me for going in there for any reason other than to bomb the place), a lady saw me getting all the supplies and she asked if it was a kitten and no, it wasn't and she heaped wonderful warming praises upon me for taking the less attractive from the shelter. She is purrr-fect for me. Knows where to poop and everything. Yeah, it's on the sofa, but at least she knows where to go.

 
At Saturday, February 24, 2007 at 8:36:00 PM PST , Blogger Candace said...

Hee hee! On the sofa! ^_^

No, I haven't seen that! I shall do my best to please Logo.

I shop at DevilMart, too. ^_^ They provide a lot of jobs in this area, so *shrug* (plus, I'm cheap ^_^ )

The book I am reading for reviews varies between "hey, I wonder what happens next?" and "OMG, ANOTHER typo/misspelt word/missing word! This book SUCKS!" I look forward to reading a real book again.

 
At Monday, February 26, 2007 at 1:27:00 PM PST , Blogger Gawpo said...

Whew! A friend. Me? Cheap. That's it, pure and simple.

Now I have to go scrape the couch.

 
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